Frequently Asked Questions About Groov-Pins

Groov-Pins

Q: Where would you use a Groov-Pin?

A: You can use Groov-Pins in thousands of places. Here are a few examples:

  • Hinges for rotation
  • Valves for a T-turn
  • Sprinklers as a fulcrum pin
  • Latches for rotation
  • Heat Sinks for locating pins
  • Firearms for holding together the trigger and hammer
  • Conveyor Chain for linking tracks together
  • Hand Tools as swivel pins in universal joints
  • Pumps for spring anchors and locating pins
  • Shaft for locating pin for gears or other attachments
  • Locks for tamper-proof assembly

Q: Why would I use a Groov-Pin?

A: There are many reasons to use Groov-Pins. Here are a few benefits of using our Groov-Pins:

  • They require only a straight hole, without the need for close tolerances. The expanded diameter allows for relaxed tolerances in the application hole.
  • There are no reaming, milling, or tapping operations involved, keeping production costs low.
  • They withstand severe shock and vibration.
  • They are solid, which makes them stronger than spring pins.
  • They are made in different groove types to suit a variety of applications.
  • They can provide a smooth bearing surface for rotation.
  • They are quick and easy to install.

Q: How does the Groov-Pin work?

A: The expanded diameter gets pressed back to its original size (nominal diameter) when the Groov-Pin is inserted into the hole. The pin then tries to return to the expanded diameter, but is constrained by the hole's wall. This constraining action causes a locking fit, which resists severe shock and vibration.


Q: What kind of materials are our standard pins made of? Surface treatment?

A:

Material

Plating

1215 Low Carbon Steel

Cadmium, Zinc, Nickel, Oil, Black Oxide, None.

303 Stainless Steel Passivation, None.
6150 Alloy Steel Cadmium, Zinc, Nickel, Oil, Black Oxide, None






Q: What is the shear strength for Groov-Pins compared to Spring Pins?

A: The Groov-Pin shear strength is up to twice the shear strength of a spring pin of the same diameter. The shear resistance of alloy steel Groov-Pins can be 40% higher than that of a heavy-duty spring pin.


Q: What size hole should a Groov-Pin be installed in?

A: The suggested hole size can be found on page 7 in the Groov-Pin Catalog.


Q: What is the tolerance for overall length and straightness of Groov-Pins?

A: The tolerance for overall length is +/-.010 inch and for straightness +/-010 per inch.


 Q: With what kind of equipment can I install a Groov-Pin? How much force is required?

A: Groov-Pins can be pressed in by hammer, air cylinder, or hydraulic press. For the required insertion force, see the chart found on page 12 in the Groov-Pin Catalog.


 Q: What is the difference between Tapered Groove and Parallel Groove?

 A: A parallel groove has more engagement between the pin and the hole walls. A parallel groove has higher pull-out strength, but requires a higher insertion force.


 Q: How are Groov-Pin dimensions and characteristics measured?

 A:

Overall Length Caliper
Pin Diameter Micrometer
Expansion Diameter Ring Gage
Groove Length Caliper